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Taliban leader Mullah Baradar injured in clash with Haqqanis: Reports

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Guwahati: It seems the formation of a Taliban-led government may take more time with its co-founder Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar reportedly received injuries during a clash late on Friday between his group and ally, Haqqani Network.

After the clash, ISI chief Lt Gen Faiz Hameed rushed to Kabul on Saturday in a quick change of role from a professed bystander to an active troubleshooter, says a media report.

The report quoted Hameed as saying in a video clip on his arrival in Kabul: “Don’t worry, everything will be okay.”

In reply to a question, whether he would be meeting the Taliban leadership, the ISI chief paused to look at Pakistan’s ambassador to Kabul, Mansour Ahmad Khan, before saying: “I have just landed. We are working for peace and stability in Afghanistan.”

The first official visit by the top Pakistani intelligence official to Afghanistan since the country fell to the
Taliban was apparently hastened by the latter’s worsening dispute with allies and factions over its choice of the supreme leader.

Afghanistan vice-president Amrullah Saleh has been quoted as saying in a “dispatch from the frontline” to the UK-based Daily Mail that despite Pakistan’s claims to the contrary, the Taliban were being “micromanaged” by the ISI.

It has been reported that gunfire was heard in Kabul on Friday night and it was the result of a power struggle between Baradar and Anas Haqqani.

Sher Mohammed Stanekzai and Sirajuddin Haqqani may be given positions of power in the new government while Baradar seems set for a leading role, according to reports.

According to another report, while Baradar wants elements from the minority communities to be included in the government, the Haqqanis led by Taliban deputy leader Sirajuddin and his terrorist brood do not want to share power with anyone.

With the tacit backing of mentor and promoter Pakistan, the Haqqanis want a pure Taliban government to be formed based on medieval theocracy.

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